Tuesday, September 13, 2016

Obumu Media Collective



By Scott Macklin
This video is a testament and document of the ground changing work of the participating youth in the Obumu Media Collective.

In March of 2014, Communication Leadership's Scott Macklin and Jonathan Cunningham (EMP) traveled to Kampala, Uganda to partner with the Bavubuka Foundation to create the Obumu Media Lab dedicated to hip-hop and digital media education. While there, we connected with and facilitating workshops for youth dedicated to community-centric storytelling, hip-hop journalism, video-editing and entrepreneurship.

In July, we partnered with One Vibe Africa to co-presents ZIWA, a collective multi-media experience (photography, video, music and painting) providing an intimate experience of the vibrant culture, people and landscape of sister countries, Kenya and Uganda. Inspired by the continuity of creativity of East African youth, this event at the 2312 Gallery showcases photos and art created by professionals alongside equally captivating images shot by youth. ZIWA is Kiswahili for "lake" and in this instance, represents Lake Victoria, which directly connects Kenya and Uganda.

A film by Scott Macklin and with additional footage provided by the Obumu Media Collective and What's Good 206.

Artists Collaborate to Bring More Art to African Youth

Originally published by What's Good  206
                    
Photographers Meg Stacker, Scott Macklin (Obumu Collective), and Jonathan Cunningham have collaborated with One Vibe-Africa, in Kenya and the Bavabuka Foundation, in Uganda to do an art showcase, Ziwa, at art gallery 2312; off 2nd Ave in downtown Seattle. The showcase brings awareness to their recent works and introduces their newest projects that they are working on. The grand opening of the showcase featured some performances from Kenyan and Ugandan artists, as well as the foundations founders and photographers briefly speaking. The art will be displayed all month, and all the proceeds go towards strengthening both foundations art programs for the youth. In this episode, we got a look inside both foundations and One Vibe- Africa's newest photo project.


Shot and edited by: Austin Williams, Nirali Shah

Words Beats and Life Teaching Artists reflections

After Words Beats and Life trip to Kampala Uganda to visit the Bavubuka Foundation and teach various workshops to young hip-hop artists there, They interviewed the teaching artists and staff from Words Beats & Life who went to gather their reflections on the time they spent abroad. Here's what they had to say......

Talking Heads: WBL's Post Uganda Reflections from Words Beats & Life on Vimeo.

The SEED Show

10 up and coming Ugandan fashion designers and entrepreneurs showcased looks designed to represent the U.S. Uganda partnership. Malaika caught up with Lugaflow artist, Babaluku.






Telling a story with your body

Originally published at Amaphiko Redbull
Ugandan local Faisal Mostrixx has made a name for himself by expertly fusing traditional tribal dance moves with contemporary hip hop. He explains what dance means in Uganda and why his work as a teacher, mentor and choreographer is making a difference.



BY Kieran Yates on 
Ugandan local Faisal Mostrixx has made a name for himself by expertly fusing traditional tribal dance moves with contemporary hip hop. He explains what dance means in Uganda and why his work as a teacher, mentor and choreographer is making a difference.
Dance needs a lot of patience and hard work, and back home we lack a lot of facilities. You can practise on the grass, and we have a few studios. Young people see me and are inspired but how do you give back when you don’t have rehearsal space? In the end, it’s about the love of it, and the connection. I go and teach for free and I meet these people because I know they might take something from me. These are not just moves: they teach us a way of living and about different kind of people from different backgrounds.

I started dancing when I was nine. I was very active in music, dance and drama in school in Uganda. It’s been a part of me and my family. My mum used to take me to traditional dance practice all the time so it has been with me since I was a kid.

People call me ‘Mostrixx’ because I have the most tricks! I try to pick from different dance styles and then evolve it to make it my own. They also call me the ‘crazy dancer’!
Right now, the biggest dance that is practised in Uganda is the breakdance. Someone takes what they love, gives it to another person who gives it to another person, so we all end up working together. The reason is because of the social power of it and people work together to teach each other.

Music and dance are two powerful elements. I’m very driven by the music and inspired by the sound. I’m a beat maker too so I’m very inspired by the texture of music. My background as a dancer is very intricate and about speed - how fast can you move to the floor and back? It’s all about moving with the texture of the music. It has an emotion behind it that can inspire the body or the mind to go into certain worlds.

I love watching people dance with African rhythms with contemporary hip hop. It takes me back to where I come from. When the two meet it is magical. In Africa, we have a variety of traditional dance styles with a lot of background and story behind them. I think it’s important to fuse them because I come from a land that has over 50 tribes and each of those have at least five traditional dances, with many elements and motifs and rhythms. For me to pick them and put them into contemporary is something new and unique.
“I run free classes in Uganda because these are not just moves. They show us a way of living and they teach us about different people from different backgrounds”
Dancing makes me feel like I’m young all the time. It makes me feel that I get connected with other souls and other people’s stories. It takes away the stress. It makes my day fresh and new every time.

I remember when I was around 10 and the teacher would go out of the classroom, I would jump out in front of the class and entertain the people. What I’m trying to show with my body, as a dance teacher, or a mover, or a choreographer, is my story. When I first came out and said that I wanted to be a dancer, my family were like, ‘No, you have to be an engineer’. Parents tell their kids these things back home, they say ‘this isn’t a job’. Now, when I travel, I don’t feel alone, I feel like my community back home are with me.

I’m in love with Uganda. The youth are so motivated with the arts, across painting, singing, music. I also hope to see a professional community of professional dancers because in Uganda, everyone can dance. I want to see parents empowering children to fulfil their dreams because we have a lot to say. We have a story to tell.
Faizal Mostrixx was at ImPulsTanz international festival of dance in Vienna. Find out more about Faizal here

Monday, September 12, 2016

Scene Shifters -- Hip-Hop, Digital Media, and Social Change in Kampala, Uganda




BY Prof. Scott Macklin
One may say that Hip Hop moves masses. But the question arises, is it a movement that amasses moves that matter? In this presentation we will strive to demonstrate movements that are having deep impact. In March of 2014, we traveled to Kampala, Uganda to participate in the Obumu Media Lab dedicated to hip-hop and digital media education. While there, we connected with and facilitating workshops for youth dedicated to community-centric storytelling, hip-hop journalism, video-editing and entrepreneurship.


In the eyes and ears of young people, hip-hop is undoubtedly the most popular form of African American music in our country right now and arguably the world. But what successes and pitfalls are created when this indigenous African American music genre is used as a vehicle for social change in Africa, particularly in a country as politically charged as Uganda? The flipside of that is Uganda is also a country where a whopping 78% of the population is under the age of 30. That's a lot of young people and many of them are listening to and or creating hip-hop music.

Sunday, September 11, 2016

Indigenous HipHop & Sustainable Agriculture.

As the OBUMU  Family we are always pushing the envelope to show the power of Hip Hop in Africa designed from the spirit of it true Authentic Indigenous context. As we kick off our season this year to raise the bar for all indigenous Hip Hop Practitioners in Uganda, today we are making history once again Introducing the first ever Indigenous Hip Hop Farmers Market. We would like to thank all the mothers from the market and the youth who are dedicating their time and commitment to bridging the gap between the youth and elders creating new space for both healing and restoring our generation through a shared wisdom that strengthen our vision of the trans formative change we all want to see and be apart of in our villages cities and towns. Thanks to The Davis Peace Project , Kalamazoo College Arcus Center for Social Justice Leadership and Bavubuka Allstarz Foundation for believing in the future of indigenous Hip Hop Practitioners in Uganda. We would also like to appreciate - the youth movement involved in this history making experience - Talanta Youth Movement-TYM, Tandika Esaawa , 256 Youth Platform Youthplatform Platform, Tontoma Youth Community - TYC and the Dorcus Project Uganda.

 You all present us a new opportunity of exploring the authentic truth within encouraging our youth to reconnect to Our Beloved Land and the Elders Wisdom. Respect to the The UG - Hiphop - Archivist for sponsoring the covering of this historical gathering.

Gadget

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